Jean Luc Ponty Interviewed by Al Bartholet

Ponty is the son of a violin teacher, who began his instruction before he moved on to the Paris Conservatory. By the mid 1960s he had moved towards jazz, recording with Stéphane Grappelli and Stuff Smith. Ponty's attraction to jazz was propelled by Miles Davis's and John Coltrane's music, which led him to adopt the electric violin. Critic Joachim Berendt wrote that "Since Ponty, the jazz violin has been a different instrument" and of his "style of phrasing that corresponds to early and middle John Coltrane" and his "brilliance and fire". [1]
In 1967 he visited the USA for the Monterey Jazz Festival [2] and then made an appearance on Frank Zappa's Hot Rats album.
Ponty subsequently worked with Stéphane Grappelli, the Mahavishnu Orchestra, and Frank Zappa, and appeared on more than 70 recordings. His symphonic style to jazz fusion made him a popular fusion artist of the 70's.
In 1972, he featured prominently on Elton John's Honky Chateau album.
In 1977 he pioneered the use of the 5-string electric violin, with a lower C string. He sometimes also uses a 6-string electric violin called the Violectra, with low C and F strings – not to be confused with the violectra he played from the late 1960s to the mid-80s which had 4 strings, but tuned an octave lower. Ponty was among the first to combine the violin with MIDI, distortion boxes, phase shifters, and wah-wah pedals. This resulted in his signature, almost synthesizer-like sound.
In 2005 Ponty formed the acoustic fusion supergroup TRIO! with legendary bassist Stanley Clarke and Banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck.

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